Violence Statistics 2017-12-14T13:20:18+01:00

Violence Statistics

Violence Statistics in Education

  1. A survey of university and college staff has found that 1 in 10 of those surveyed had been threatened or intimidated at work because of their sexual or gender identity.
  2. 3% of workers in further or higher education have been physically assaulted at work because of their sexuality.
  3. An NASUWT survey of 5,000 teachers found nearly half of those teachers believe their school had a problem with behaviour.
    a. Of the 5,000 teachers surveyed, 10% stated that they had been physically assaulted by a pupil.
    b. 54% of the teachers surveyed claim to have received verbal abuse from pupils.
    c. 47% of the teachers surveyed stated that their schools had a behaviour problem.
  4. A survey conducted by the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) in 2014 revealed that 4% of their members had been physically attacked at work.
  5. A Times Education Supplement (TES) survey of 6,000 teachers in the US, UK and Australia found that approximately half of the teachers surveyed had been physically threatened by a student during their careers.

Violence Statistics in Health

  1. Between 1 April 2015 and 31 March 2016, 373 staff members from the Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust were assaulted, according to the Royal College of Nursing, with more than 70,000 NHS staff assaulted in the same period.
  2. At Musgrove Park Hospital in Somerset, 126 staff were physically assault, 88 suffered verbal abuse, 30 suffered a threat of abuse.
  3. A survey conducted by the Royal College of Nursing found that around 48% of those surveyed had suffered some form of abuse in the two preceding years. 1300 nurses, who work in the community, were the subject of the survey. 11% of those surveyed claimed that this involved physical abuse or assaults, as well as verbal abuse.
  4. In a report entitled “Struggling to Cope” by the public-sector union, UNISON, based, in large part, upon a survey which UNISON conducted, the union noted that there was a common theme amongst its members caring for people with mental health problems, that verbal and/or physical aggression towards those carers happened on an almost daily basis. Of those who undertook the survey, 42% stated that they had been the subject of a violent or aggressive incident from a service user/patient in the last year, with a number suffering from physical assaults. Around 36% of the people who responded to the survey claim to have witnessed a colleague being the victim of a violent incident caused by a service user.

Shocking Violence at Work Statistics

The public sector union, UNISON, has produced a new report entitled “Struggling to Cope” which, in large part, continues its theme in exposing the significant risk that many people, particularly in the public sector, experience from being assaulted at work.  The report notes that 1 in 4 people in the United Kingdom experience a mental health problem each year.  The union notes that with an increasing number of people with mental health conditions, it is often those who care for these people who are exposed to a rise in violence meted out on them.

“Struggling to Cope” has been, in large part, based upon a survey which UNISON conducted.  The union noted that there was a common theme amongst its members caring for people with mental health problems, that verbal and/or physical aggression towards those carers happened on an almost daily basis.  Of those who undertook the survey, 42% stated that they had been the subject of a violent or aggressive incident from a service user/patient in the last year, with a number suffering from physical assaults.  Around 36% of the people who responded to the survey claim to have witnessed a colleague being the victim of a violent incident caused by a service user.

The survey highlights that lone working and cuts to budgets have led to an increase in violence at work.  36% of those surveyed felt that violent incidents had become increasingly frequent in the last year, with 87% citing a lack of staff as the reason for the increase in assaults on their colleagues.  Half of those surveyed also thought that the overuse of agency staff, who were unable to get to know patients with mental health problems sufficiently well enough, was a reason for the increase in attacks at work.

28% of those surveyed were of the opinion that a lack of training, particularly in de-escalation techniques, was a factor in the rise of violence-at-work incidents.  12% of respondents to this survey had not received de-escalation training when it was, in fact, mandatory for their role.  This, of course, meant that in the event that a service user or patient was violent with them, they did not know how to calm the situation down.

Alarmingly, only 38% of staff who’d been the subject of a violent or aggressive episode felt supported by their manager after the event.    With 32% of people surveyed stating that they did not even report the violent incident at work, because there were too many, it is likely that the violence-at-work statistics held by the various NHS Trusts is likely to be significantly lower than it ought to be.

In part, due to the level of violence meted out on public sector workers who work with patients with mental health issues, almost half were planning to leave working in the mental health sector.  Positively, and perhaps unsurprisingly, 67% of those surveyed found that their work in the mental health sector was particularly rewarding.

If you are working in the mental health sector and you have been the victim of an assault at work which has caused you either a physical and/or psychological injury, then you may wish to explore the possibility of bringing a claim for that assault at work.  Truth Legal are specialists in assault-at-work compensation because we understand the need to fully comprehend how you work, what particular issues each service user or patient has, and the need for specialist control and restraint and de-escalation training which your job likely requires of you.  Assault-at-work compensation claims are complicated, and it is essential that your specialist personal injury solicitor understands your job, so they may accurately assess your prospects of winning your case.

If you wish to have a free, no-obligation consultation with one of our specialist assault-at-work solicitors, please contact us to arrange a consultation at a time convenient for you.